All posts tagged: soul jazz records

Calypso; Musical poetry in the caribbean 1955-69

Available in all good retail and internet stores or direct from Soul Jazz Records. This new album features the music of Calypso in its many styles. Included is music from its birthplace – the island of Trinidad – as well as a number of other Caribbean islands (including Jamaica and the Bahamas) and its subsequent onwards journey (Britain, Panama and the United States), recorded during the years 1955-69. Calypso is one of the most exciting and enduring forms of musical expression to emerge from the beginning of the 20th century – swinging, persuasive rhythm, brilliantly expressive melodies and lyrics of great humour and wisdom. Calypsonians songs play out a role in society similar to the storytelling Griots of West Africa (and the corresponding music of Kaiso); with their own tales about popular and incredible news items, modern life, local politics all mixed up with sexual innuendo, one-upmanship, comedy and more. At its source, Calypso is intricately and inextricably bound to the social history of Trinidad and its myriad of traditions, beliefs, folklore and fables. As …

Rastafari: The Dreads Enter Babylon 1955-83

The link between reggae music and Rastafarian culture is inextricable. This ambitious but incredibly informative compendium from Soul Jazz Records looks at that relationship between an art form and a belief system with a collection of righteous, highly devotional reggae music on record. With offerings from Ras Michael and The Sons of Negus, Bongo Herman, Earth & Stone and many more, this compilation covers the best part of 30 years where genuinely revolutionary releases were coming through. This collection is built from authentic snapshots of the culture and the music which surrounded it.   At the source of the music of Rastafari is the figurehead master drummer and leader Count Ossie, who first bought the deeply spiritual nyabinghi and burro rhythms heard and played at sacred Rastafarian grounation (reasoning) sessions into popular Jamaican music through his many collaborations and performances with artists – from The Skatalites to The Folks Brothers – and producers – including Clement Dodd, Prince Buster and Harry Mudie. At the start of the 1970s Count Ossie formed the Mystic Revelation of …