All posts filed under: Art

You don’t take a photograph, you make it: two artists working with found portraits

Fat Nancy’s been looking at things to do with photographs from markets and car boot sales, grandma’s attic and old photo studios … here’s two artists working with found portraits that FN’s been looking at again today. Playful and an absolute Fat Nancy favourite is John Stezaker. There’s a nice short interview from the Guardian here: http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2012/aug/08/john-stezaker-best-photograph I call my combinations of images of men and women “marriages”. It is an old idea for me, although this is a recent work, from my series Muse. Each picture consists of a man smoking combined with a female other half, the idea being that he is “inhaling inspiration”, which is classically associated with the female. When I started producing marriages, I felt I was creating new beings. They were more like people than the original bland glamour shots of the 40s and 50s that I used as source material. Somehow, when they got broken up and recombined, real people seemed to emerge. John Stezaker And then Julie Cockburn, who’s mode of attack seems to be a kind …

Collection IV: Bharti Kher

Bharti Kher was born 1969 in London to parents who had migrated to England as adults. She studied painting, graduating in 1991 from Newcastle Polytechnic. In 1992 she travelled to India, deciding to live there permanently after meeting her future husband, the artist Subodh Gupta. The couple live and work in Delhi and have two children.                         CLICK FOR MORE

Collection III: TAKING SHOTS: WILLIAM S. BURROUGHS

William S. Burroughs (1914-1997) was one of the most influential American writers of the 20th century. Despite his prolific achievements as a novelist, essayist, spoken word performer and painter, Burroughs’ work as a photographer is rarely acknowledged. Burroughs’ vast photographic oeuvre offers new and important insights into his artistic and creative processes. Burroughs’ photographs, striking in their self-containment, lack any reference to other practitioners or genres. While they can be gathered into categories of street scenes, still lifes, collage, radio towers, people – his dynamic approach to image making sits outside of any canonical structure. Despite his prolific achievements as a novelist, essayist, spoken word performer and painter, Burroughs’ work as a photographer is rarely acknowledged.