All posts filed under: Art

REPRESENT III – Hamra Abbas

Hamra Abbas represented by Lawrie Shabibi Hamra Abbas’s work is playful and unpredictable, it has a definite presence, but is so versatile that it is hard to pin down exactly what it is about an Abbas work that tells you it is hers. Fat Nancy takes a look at why she likes it so much. Firstly and overarching, Abbas’s work is pure. In its use of colour, its concepts and humour, she sticks to absolute and direct messaging. The colours she uses are sharp, clear and translucent, even when used in prints. They remind FN of David Batchelor’s works, often managing to bring a similar brightness to the fore without the need for artificial light, using instead natural light, colour on paper, on glass, with food colouring in plasticine, as a tool to manipulate and reflect the intensity she desires. Abbas’s life, and consequently her work, could be said to be somewhat fractured – coming from Pakistan and a deeply Islamic community and now living and working in the USA. Perhaps it is this contradiction that makes it addictively erratic, fickle and playfully …

REPRESENTED II – Mehreen Murtaza

Artist Mehreen Murtaza – represented by Grey Noise Mehreen Murtaza’s visual narratives intertwine a traditional context with popular culture. Taking their imagery from both Sufi culture and the skewed logic of science fiction, her labour-intensive digital collages are a virtual world that fuses the natural with the mechanical, where technology plays the role of challenging religious myth, superstition and ritual. Found images – sourced from print, digital and electronic media – come together in her work to form intriguing collages. Lawyers assemble on streets amid a burst of sinister red; a Big Brother-like figure watches the goings-on from the heavens; and a superhero takes flight into a great gig in the sky. Those who are aware of political and social upheavals in Pakistan will find enough resonances in Murtaza’s work without being oppressed by the obvious. Murtaza’s work draws on Stuckist and Pop Art influences, Richard Hamilton in particular, with an absorption of the nuances of indigenous iconography –  miniature painting, film posters and Truck Art imagery of Pakistan. Her work also reminds Fat Nancy …

REPRESENT I – Hassan Hajjaj

REPRESENT I – the first part in a FNND series of profiles of artists represented by galleries in Dubai.  Artist and designer Hassan Hajjaj – represented by The Third Line Born in Larache, Morocco, in 1961, Hassan Hajjaj left Morocco for London at an early age. Heavily influence by the club, hip-hop, and reggae scenes of London as well as by his North African heritage, Hajjaj is a self-taught and thoroughly versatile artist whose work includes portraiture, installation, performance, fashion, and interior design, including furniture made from recycled utilitarian objects from North Africa, such as upturned Coca-Cola crates as stools and aluminium cans turned into lamps. Turning to photography in the late 80s, Hajjaj is a master portraitist, taking studio portraits of friends, musicians, and artists, as well as strangers from the streets of Marrakech, often wearing clothes designed by the artist. These colourful and engaging portraits combine the visual vocabulary of contemporary fashion photography and pop art, as well as the studio photography of African artist Malick Sidibe, in an intelligent commentary on the influences …

You don’t take a photograph, you make it: two artists working with found portraits

Fat Nancy’s been looking at things to do with photographs from markets and car boot sales, grandma’s attic and old photo studios … here’s two artists working with found portraits that FN’s been looking at again today. Playful and an absolute Fat Nancy favourite is John Stezaker. There’s a nice short interview from the Guardian here: http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2012/aug/08/john-stezaker-best-photograph I call my combinations of images of men and women “marriages”. It is an old idea for me, although this is a recent work, from my series Muse. Each picture consists of a man smoking combined with a female other half, the idea being that he is “inhaling inspiration”, which is classically associated with the female. When I started producing marriages, I felt I was creating new beings. They were more like people than the original bland glamour shots of the 40s and 50s that I used as source material. Somehow, when they got broken up and recombined, real people seemed to emerge. John Stezaker And then Julie Cockburn, who’s mode of attack seems to be a kind …

Collection IV: Bharti Kher

Bharti Kher was born 1969 in London to parents who had migrated to England as adults. She studied painting, graduating in 1991 from Newcastle Polytechnic. In 1992 she travelled to India, deciding to live there permanently after meeting her future husband, the artist Subodh Gupta. The couple live and work in Delhi and have two children.                         CLICK FOR MORE