Author: FNND

Cover Story – Part V – Westminster Records

Westminster Records was an American classical music record label, issuing original recordings until 1965. It was co–founded in 1949 by Mischa Naida (who later founded Musical Heritage Society, the owner of the Westminster Record Shop in New York City, businessman James Grayson (1897–1980), conductor Henry Swoboda, and Henry Gage. Its trademark was Big Ben and its slogan was “natural balance”, referring to its single microphone technique in recording music, similar to Mercury Records’ Living Presence series. Early on, its recordings were technically superior to most others in the marketplace, and the label became popular among the growing community of audiophiles. In the late 1950s the company began issuing stereophonic recordings, including a rare disc of the music of Swedish composer Hugo Alfvén (1872-1960), conducted by the composer. The “Westminster Laboratory” (W-Lab) series of classical recordings were technically superior to other brands and sold at higher price than the regular Westminsters. The company was sold in the early 1960s to ABC-Paramount Records, which at first continued to issue new material (as well as reissuing old recordings …

Collection VIII: Jac Leirner

Jac Leirner, born in São Paulo, Brasil, 1961. Lives and works in São Paulo.         “Jac Leirner’s multifaceted work is formulated through a process of collecting and ordering; tapping into what the artist has described as the ‘infinity of materials’. Since the mid-1980s, Leirner has amassed the ephemeral and incidental products of consumer culture, and reappropriated them into visually compelling sculptures and installations that demand to be both seen and read. Through their seriality and bold accents of colour, her work references both the history of Brazilian Constructivisim as well as the legacy of Arte Povera and Minimalism.” – White Cube For more information also click here

I Dream Of Wires; A modular synth Documentary

“I Dream of Wires” (IDOW) is an upcoming, independent documentary film about the phenomenal resurgence of the modular synthesizer — exploring the passions, obsessions and dreams of people who have dedicated part of their lives to this esoteric electronic music machine. IDOW is written and directed by Robert Fantinatto with Jason Amm (Ghostly International recording artist Solvent) serving as producer and co-writer. Inventors, musicians and enthusiasts are interviewed about their relationship with the modular synthesizer — for many, it’s an all-consuming passion. Established musicians such as Trent Reznor (Nine Inch Nails), Carl Craig and John Foxx show off their systems and explain why they opt to use this volatile but ultimately rewarding technology. Meanwhile, a new generation of dance and electronica artists including Clark, James Holden and Factory Floor explain why they’ve stepped away from laptops to embrace the sound and physicality of modular synthesizers. Innovative companies like Modcan and Doepfer, driven by a desire to revive modular synthesizers, discuss how they planted the seeds that have now grown into a major cottage industry. What started out as a “vintage-revival scene” in the ’90s has grown into an underground phenomena with a growing market …

The rise of new wave coffee in the middle east

For the first time ever, The speciality coffee association arrived in the Middle East to take part in The Gulf food show. This move shows the sharp rise of the modern coffee house in The Middle East and the Arabic willingness to continue strong traditions alongside modern coffee fashions and techniques. In a three part article, FNND tracked down local coffee roasters, baristas and industry folks based in the united Arab Emirates to find out the reasons behind this Middle Eastern coffee Renaissance… 1.  Hi, so, can you tell me how popular is the syphon brewing method in the region and why? The syphon has a long way to go in this region, It has become really popular in Japan and Korea. Over here the ibrik reigns supreme. Glass tubes, glowing elements, bubbling water in glass bulbs. The siphon looks impressive because it’s a very theatrical piece of kit but there is a real skill to making coffee on it and it is most important to know what type of coffee best suits the syphon …